Archive for the ‘Energy’ Category

Back to School, Back to Wellness

Posted on: August 24th, 2010 by doctor No Comments

It is a great time of year to improve the health of your family.  While preparing for the coming school year, it can take only a few moments to identify simple steps that will substantially improve your family’s wellness and make your life simpler.

Sleep is important – I consider it an essential nutrient.  Some medical studies show that decreased sleep can increase your chances of getting a cold.  Healthy amounts of sleep also improve mood and support weight loss.  Keeping regular bed times and avoiding stimulating activities (i.e. movies, wild play, caffeine, and sugar) before bed can go a long way to getting your family to bed at a reasonable hour and waking refreshed.

Vitamin D is important for both neurological and immune function.  Vitamin D is produced in the skin when exposed to direct sunlight – something that does not occur in cooler months of the year.  2,000 IU of vitamin D per day is safe for adults and children older than 12 months.

Healthy food is the cornerstone of good health.  Most people know that vegetables, fruits and whole grains are health foods, but many don’t realize the many negative effects of refined carbohydrates.  Beyond encouraging obesity, refined sugars cause emotional agitation and reduce immune function; some studies show that sugar, honey, and maple syrup reduce the ability of white blood cells to destroy bacteria by as much as 50%!  Simply reducing – it is not necessary to eliminate – intake of refined carbohydrates can have many positive health effects for your family.

Imagine what your family’s school year could be like with less illness and irritability.  Imagine how this can improve your stress level and support the time and energy required for raising a family and having fulfilling relationships.  Sometimes, great changes can result from the simplest of interventions.

Be Well,

Richard

Video: Natural Treatments for Depression

Posted on: May 29th, 2009 by doctor No Comments

Click to Watch in a New Window (180 MB)

This video, on depression, is one of the presentations I delivered at the 2008 Kushi Institute Summer Conference.

Enjoy!

Richard

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More Vitamin D News

Posted on: March 3rd, 2009 by doctor No Comments

Published on February 23rd, 2009 in the Archives of Internal Medicine, a very large study with 18,000 participants found that the people with lowest serum vitamin D levels (based on 25-OH Vitamin D testing as mentioned in the last post) were 36% more likely to get an upper respiratory tract infection than people with the highest (but safe) levels of serum vitamin D.

Another similar study from August of 2008 published in the same journal showed a 26% reduced risk of death (all-cause mortality) in people with the highest (but safe) vitamin D levels when compared to people with the lowest vitamin D levels.

Vitamin D deficiency is epidemic in northern latitudes, with 50% of some populations being clinically deficient.

Vitamin D acts like a hormone in the body – it regulates calcium metabolism (addressing osteoporosis), affects blood pressure (lowering effect), improves mood (likely by increasing levels of important neurotransmitters), and affects immune function (useful for colds, prevention of allergies in newborns, and possibly auto-immune disease).

Click HERE to get the best available vitamin D or go to my Holistic Pharmacy to find the best nutrients, herbs and supplements available.

Be Well,

Richard

Hypothyroidism: Many Symptoms, One Disease

Posted on: January 1st, 2009 by doctor No Comments

If you have been experiencing persistent fatigue or sadness, it may be more complicated than simply shifting your attitude or pulling yourself up by your bootstraps.  Fatigue and depression (and many other problems) may be signs of a physical medical condition: hypothyroidism – a decrease in the function of the thyroid gland that results in lower levels of thyroid hormone throughout the body.  It may even be possible to have low thyroid function while blood test interpretations say that all is normal.

Thyroid hormone is produced by the thyroid gland; a subtle butterfly shaped gland found in the neck below the Adam’s apple and on either side of the trachea.  Thyroid hormone is important to many parts of the body.  It sends a message to cells in the body to increase activity, function, and energy consumption.  The more thyroid hormone that is present, the faster body systems and organs will run.  It is possible to have too much (hyperthyroidism) or too little thyroid hormone (hypothyroidism).

Effects of Low Thyroid Function:

The symptoms of low thyroid function are diverse and vary considerably from person to person.  The manifestations of hypothyroidism can be vague or subtle, slowly getting worse over months or years.  Patients with hypothyroidism often experience some of the following symptoms: fatigue, depression, poor memory, unclear thinking, low body temperature, cold hands and feet, sensitivity to cold, dry skin, constipation, frequent infections, weight gain, premenstrual syndrome, or hoarseness.

Having hypothyroidism is also associated with several medical conditions; low thyroid function can cause or contribute to infertility, menstrual irregularities, elevated cholesterol levels, atherosclerosis, heart disease, anemia, and carpel tunnel syndrome.

Diagnosis and Treatment:

Thyroid function is first assessed by checking a hormone that tells the thyroid gland to make more hormone, thyroid stimulating hormone or TSH.  Elevated TSH levels are a sign of low thyroid function while low TSH levels are indicative of hyperthyroidism.

The predominant medical view is that in the absence of elevated TSH, hypothyroidism cannot be diagnosed.  However, the possibility of hypothyroidism that is not detected by current lab tests and current standards does exist.  The standards for normal thyroid function have changed over the years and some endocrinologists believe that current standards miss many patients suffering from low thyroid function.  

The easiest treatment for hypothyroidism is supplementation with synthetic or animal derived thyroid hormone.  Improvement in symptoms usually takes as little as a few days or as long as six months.  However, excessive thyroid hormone replacement can cause high levels of thyroid in the body – hyperthyroidism – and result in anxiety, insomnia, palpitations, chest tightness, diarrhea, and osteoporosis.  So, thyroid hormone should be used carefully and with medical supervision – appropriate diagnosis and monitoring are important.

Addressing the Cause:

Iodine used to be a common cause of hypothyroidism.  Today, in our society iodine deficiency is rare.  Conversely, very high doses of iodine can cause hypothyroidism in as short as a few weeks and long term high daily intake seems to increase the risk of hypothyroidism over the years.

In today’s medical practice, hypothyroidism is most commonly caused by one of two issues: 1) an auto-immune attack on the thyroid gland; or 2) the thyroid gland puttering out – not functioning as well as is should or used to.  In either case, supplementation with thyroid hormone is helpful.

While the medical literature states that the causes of both types of hypothyroidism are unknown, there are numerous drugs and chemicals that are definitively known to cause auto-immunity or to hamper thyroid function.  Some of these substances include: food coloring; mercury; numerous solvents; and even some prescription drugs.  Some chemicals contribute to low thyroid hormone levels by increasing the liver’s breakdown of thyroid hormone.

Avoidance of these harmful substances and enhancing the body’s ability to get rid of them can be helpful.  Selenium (200 mcg daily); zinc (15 mg daily); iron (18 mg daily in absence of high iron levels); and the amino acid cysteine help the body make thyroid hormone and convert it to its most active form.  Cysteine is also important anti-oxidant that helps the body handle toxic chemicals and heavy metals.

Other supportive natural therapies include the far eastern Indian herbs ashwaganda and bacopa which support thyroid function and the action of thyroid hormone throughout the body.  Some patients benefit from supplementation with food grade thyroid gland products that supplement thyroid hormone levels.

While hypothyroidism can sneak up on people, accurate diagnosis and treatment often helps to relieve the symptoms and provides dramatic improvement quality of life.

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